Butcher block countertops…

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Butcher block countertops makes a lovely choice for surfaces because it’s affordable and transitions well in all kitchen styles. There are several types but the end grain is the strongest and camouflages knife marks. I like it for its checkerboard pattern. Maple seems to be the most popular but you can also get cherry, red oak, bamboo and zebrawood.

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Sealing will leave a shiny coating whereas unsealed is raw. If you seal the butcher block, you will want to use it on surfaces that won’t be used for food prep like kitchen tables or built-in desks. Some damages can be removed with sandpaper and maintenance requires oiling every 6 months.

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Butcher block isn’t heat resistant and it can rot and discolor with excessive wetness. This is why I like multiple surface types because then you can use the butcher block on a kitchen island and have the counters some sort of stone. Back to the affordable part, the ever lifesaver Ikea has one that is $129 for 6 feet.
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There are all sorts of info on butcher block over on The Remodelista.

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{images via the Kitchn, Smittens Studio Online, The Grothouse Lumber Company, Erik Olsson, House Beautiful,  House of Turquoise}


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